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Public Speaking Tip: How To Practice Making Eye Contact

“Perhaps the most important physical act onstage is making eye contact.” – Chris Anderson, TED Conference curator, from his article, How to Give a Killer Presentation, Harvard Business Review (June 2013) So, where the heck do we get a chance to practice making eye contact, anyway? We can’t wait until we’re in front of an audience. We need…

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TED – Robert Gupta: Music is medicine, music is sanity

Robert Gupta, violinist with the LA Philharmonic, talks about a violin lesson he once gave to a brilliant, schizophrenic musician — and what he learned. Called back onstage later, Gupta plays his own transcription of the prelude from Bach’s Cello Suite No. 1. Robert Gupta joined the LA Philharmonic at the age of 19 —…

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Wadah Khanfar (Al Jazeera): A historic moment in the Arab world

As a democratic revolution led by tech-empowered young people sweeps the Arab world, Wadah Khanfar, the head of Al Jazeera, shares a profoundly optimistic view of what’s happening in Egypt, Tunisia, Libya and beyond — at this powerful moment when people realized they could step out of their houses and ask for change.

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Elizabeth Lesser: Take “The Other” to Lunch – TED talk

There’s an angry divisive tension in the air that threatens to make modern politics impossible. Elizabeth Lesser explores the two sides of human nature within us (call them “the mystic” and “the warrior”) that can be harnessed to elevate the way we treat each other. She shares a simple way to begin real dialogue —…

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TED – Arianna Huffington: How to succeed? Get more sleep

Arianna Huffington shares a small idea that can awaken much bigger ones: the power of a good night’s sleep. Instead of bragging about our sleep deficits, she urges us to shut our eyes and see the big picture: We can sleep our way to increased productivity and happiness — and smarter decision-making.

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The Power of a Wepicenter

I enjoy being the center of attention, being the epicenter. And even more fun-er-er is seeking out other epicenters, other “centers-of-attention,” and inviting them to be part of projects where everybody utilizes their talents and strengths! So instead of a single epicenter (me), projects/events are multi-talented wepicenters (we). The TED conference is a perfect example…